New Face of HazCom

The New Face of HazCom – SDS & Label Compliance in the Post-GHS Deadline Era

Surprisingly for some, the new face of HazCom is very much like that of the HazCom in transition—it’s still in a state of flux. So while companies were thinking compliance challenges brought on by OSHA’s adoption of the Globally Harmonized System were behind them now that the GHS deadlines and phase-in period have passed, that’s unfortunately not the case. The obligations imposed by the deadlines are ongoing and the compliance challenges persist. When it comes to SDS and label compliance in particular, there seem to be more questions than answers for the millions of employers covered by the rule.

This confusion is due in part to upstream adoption delays, general misunderstandings about what has long been required under the standard compared to what was newly required as a result of GHS adoption and the ever-changing regulatory landscape. These issues collectively contribute to HazCom’s continued ranking as one of OSHA’s most frequently cited standards.

In this session, we address the often elusive areas of SDS and label compliance under HazCom. As examples, we’ll discuss OSHA’s expectations for labeling small containers and managing SDSs when the same product from different suppliers is being used. Given the integral role they play in HazCom, by equipping EHS professionals with information necessary to tackle SDS and label compliance issues head-on, we are paving the way for companies to more easily achieve and maintain a fully compliant Hazard Communication Program today and well into the future.

Chuck Haling
Vice President of Sales
VelocityEHS

Chuck has nearly 20 years of high-level strategic management experience and has authored many articles for the EHS industry. He is a sought-after speaker, presenting at dozens of events across the country, including VPPPA, NSC and ASSE conferences. Prior to joining VelocityEHS in 2007, he led sales & marketing operations for premier companies such as W.W. Grainger and Baer Supply Company. Chuck holds a Bachelor’s degree in Business Administration from Columbia University and an MBA from the J.L. Kellogg Graduate School of Business at Northwestern University.